Mustard has enough opportunity for variation that we should make, rather than buy. It also keeps well (nearly indefinitely due to the nature of the mustard seeds, the vinegar, and the salt). Stick with small batches so you can create different mustards. White and yellow seeds are the most mild, brown is a bit hotter, and black is hottest. Powdered mustard is made by grinding mustard seeds and removing the outer seed. It isn’t as strong as using the the whole seed. I generally buy the 1lb. size of powdered mustard and 1-3lb bag of brown seeds. The seeds are also good for making pickled mustard seeds, pickling vegetables, salad dressings, guacamole, etc.

Prepared Mustard

Suggested add-ins: allspice, caraway seeds, horseradish, whiskey, or garlic, Experiment with liquids, liquid temperatures, and amount of time it sits in the liquid before adding vinegar.
Prep Time10 mins
Refrigerate12 hrs
Total Time12 hrs 10 mins
Course: Condiment
Calories: 19kcal
Servings: 30

Ingredients

  • 25 g Mustard Seeds (Brown)
  • 50 g Yellow Mustard (Ground)
  • 1/2 C Cold Beer
  • 3 T White Wine Vinegar
  • 2 T Honey
  • 2 t Salt

Instructions

  • Grind the black seeds with mortar/pestle or spice grinder, Leave some whole
  • Pour into 1 pint mason jar, add yellow mustard powder and salt
  • Add cold beer, mix, and let stand ~10 minutes (mellows with time, can go longer if you want)
  • Stir in vinegar and honey
  • Store in a well-sealed container and allow to stand at least 12 hours before using

Notes

Toasting seeds in oil a bit kicks up the strength and removes some of the bitterness.
The liquid plays a big role. Soaking, in general, increases the pungency. Cold liquid triggers the chemical reaction that bumps up the heat. Hot Liquid damages this reaction and mellows out the mustard.
Feel free to use water instead of beer.
Room temperature water, for example, will be a more mellow mustard than chilled water. Normally, the pungency will mellow out in time, but adding acid, like the vinegar, locks in the flavor profile.
Bitterness is a byproduct of the chemical reaction when mustard seeds sit in cold liquid. Once it marinates in the liquid (vinegar and beer), the bitterness subsides. That’s why we wait at least 12 hours.